Breaking Rules with Beautiful Creativity

Tag Archives: Charlene Slimp

Creatively Dealing With Stress: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #7

Creatively Dealing With Stress: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #7

After so many questions related directly to our art, I wanted to ask about how other artists deal with mental and/or emotional stressors. I know first hand that there can be a lot of things going on in life that can trigger stress, and even though art itself can be an excellent way to relieve stress, it’s not the only way.

I learned to use various techniques, besides art, while in DBT (Dialectical Behavior Therapy) and used them very often when dealing with stress. Included are breathing techniques, grounding techniques and so much more. How do other creatives deal with stress, do they create art, or use similar techniques that I learned in DBT?

I would love to hear your answer to the question “What techniques do you use that have helped you when facing mental or emotional stressors?” Post your answer in the comments below.

What techniques do you use that have helped you when facing mental or emotional stressors?

Vas Littlecrow: I simply make art.  If that doesn’t work, I go outside and just enjoy a walk.  If that fails, I take a nap. – vaslittlecrow.com

 

Delisa Carnegie: I write A LOT, make more stuff, and do some sort of physical activity. I find chopping firewood to be very helpful in releasing stress. I give myself permission to make bad ugly things and sometimes I take them outside and set them on fire. – thecreativityrebellion.com

 

Charlene Slimp:  Breathing. Whenever stress gets to me, of any kind, I focus on my breathing. My mother was a yoga instructor and when I was little, I used to hyperventilate all the time. So she taught me yogic breathing. Now whenever things feel like they’re out of hand, I concentrate on breathing. I figure as long as I can still do that, I’ll be able to work through things. Even during panic attacks, my breathing rarely becomes stressed or quickened. I also find that a good nap can do wonders for your mental health, so whenever I start feeling overwhelmed, I try to grab a nap. – educatedsavage.com

 

Kesha Bruce: I generally do an hour or more of warm-up work and drawings at the beginning of every work session.  The whole point of doing these is to get into a rhythm and mental place where the work comes easily.keshabruce.com

 

Abigail Markov: I paint. – abigail-marie.com

 

Tori Deaux: At my worst points, pouring all of that emotion onto paper works wonders, and turns a negative into a positive.  Other tactics I use include meditation and other visualization techniques, along with dance — movement, especially expressive movement to music, does wonders for me (although I can be resistant at times). – circusserene.com

I would love to hear your answer to the question “What techniques do you use that have helped you when facing mental or emotional stressors?” Post your answer in the comments below.

Don’t miss out, there’s more coming up! Join us next week as we delve deeper into our relationships with our art!

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Clogged Creativity: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #6

Clogged Creativity: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #6

Sometimes it can be hard to admit, but when we’re stressed, have a ton of crap on our minds and/or our emotions are out of whack, we are just not very creative. And try as we might, as much as we know getting into some kind of creativity will help us feel better, its justContinue Reading

Defining the Relationship: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #5

Defining the Relationship: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #5

The last 4 weeks, I’ve been talking with other artists about various aspects of our relationship with our art. We’ve talked about what its like to live through our art, having an emotional attachment to our art, handling rejection from others, and separating how someone feels about our creations vs how they feel about us.Continue Reading

Friend, Fan, or Foe? An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #4

Friend, Fan, or Foe? An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #4

Last week, I asked artists about handling rejection. This week, I wanted to take a deeper look at how we, as artists, perceive how people react to our art and our relationships with them. Are they a friend, our fan, or a foe? I’ve often thought that if someone didn’t like my art, then obviouslyContinue Reading

Handling Rejection: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #3

Handling Rejection: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #3

Gosh, sometimes it can be so hard to figure out if you’re being rejected or your art is being rejected. Thinking to yourself “They don’t like my art, so they don’t like me either.” Whats an artist to do? I’ve asked myself this question so many times! How am I supposed to handle rejection? ItContinue Reading

Emotional Attachment: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #2

Emotional Attachment: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #2

I have personally gone through times when I was very emotionally attached to my art, for various reasons; some were pieces that I invested a lot of emotional energy into, some I can look at today and still vividly recall the emotional place I was in when I made it. I’ve been on both theContinue Reading

Living Through Art: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #1

Living Through Art: An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – #1

There have been times when I am so consumed with emotions while I am creating a piece of art, when I am finished it seems to embody part of who I am.  I believe that a facet of myself, at that moment in time, is sealed into my artwork. I once had a gentleman visitContinue Reading

An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – An Introduction

An Artist’s Relationship With Their Art – An Introduction

As an artist I have noticed that many of my creative friends and I have a very personal relationship with our art. We can be emotionally attached; we might be aloof; we might put our emotions into the piece, but then we move on; we might think if someone doesn’t like our art then theyContinue Reading